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#DiscussCLT is a production of Charlotte magazine and powered by OrthoCarolina.
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Oct 4, 2018

Higher education came into sharp focus this year, when Amazon passed over Charlotte—and shortlisted rival Raleigh—for the relocation of its East Coast headquarters in large part because the Queen City lacks a stronger infrastructure for higher ed. In this episode, host Andy Smith and contributing editor Greg Lacour take a look at the landscape ahead of our Oct. 17 event at Catawba Brewing. Read more about the event at discussclt.com.

Oct 1, 2018

In this episode, we present a recording of one of our most lively public discussions yet: The future of Charlotte transportation was the topic, with a panel of consisting of former city councilman and mayoral candidate Edwin Peacock, Mary Newsom of UNC Charlotte's Urban Institute, CATS deputy director John Muth, and Charlotte City Council member Greg Phipps in August.

Jul 27, 2018

Since our next event on Aug. 15 at Catawba Brewing is titled “Charlotte’s Transit Future,” we thought we'd just focus on one major transportation project for this episode: the Charlotte Gateway Station. We talk to State Transportation Secretary James Trogdon and CATS CEO John Lewis about the changes ahead. 

Make sure you RSVP to that Aug. 15 event at discussclt.com. The #discussCLT Podcast is sponsored by OrthoCarolina.

Jun 6, 2018

Cathy Bessant is Bank of America’s chief operations and technology officer and the person recently labeled the “Most Powerful Woman in Banking.” She also happens to be the co-chair North Tryon Vision Plan’s advisory committee. In this episode of the #discussCLT Podcast, we talk to her about what the plan is, what area it covers, what it means for the underserved, and much more.

Also: The next discussCLT event is titled “Charlotte Task Forces: Are They Effective?” When the city faces a crisis-from education to economic mobility-we turn to task forces. Why? And do they make a difference, or do they sometimes get in the way of progress? That’s coming up on Wednesday, June 20, at Catawba Brewing in Plaza Midwood. More on that here.

May 14, 2018

Dr. Willie Griffin, a Charlotte native and associate professor at The Citadel, will be the next historian at the Levine Museum of the New South. Griffin previously coordinated the African-American studies program at the Charleston-based military college and starts his new job in Charlotte next month. In this episode, we talk to Griffin about the move. 


The #DiscussCLT podcast is a production of Charlotte magazine and powered by OrthoCarolina.

Apr 21, 2018

The next #discussCLT event (April 25) is "Social Media & Kids. It's Complicated,” and on this episode, we set the stage for that conversation. Host Andy Smith talks to a few Charlotte parents about raising kids in the age of social media. Also: Andy's oldest daughter, Elliot, and U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith make appearances. Be sure to RSVP for the discussion event on Wednesday at Catawba Brewing Co. (6 p.m.) at discussCLT.com.

Mar 27, 2018

Hi. Charlotte magazine digital editor Andy Smith here. The experts all agree: The mark of a thriving cultural community is one in which people buy local art. However, galleries and other arts spaces have a reputation for being pretentious and, at times, a bit inaccessible. As someone who covers the arts, I disagree. And so does Neely Verano, director of LaCa Projects. We talk about that, as well as the major changes for the FreeMoreWest space, in this episode. 

RSVP now for the next live #DiscussCLT event, Wednesday, February 28, 6 p.m. at Catwaba Brewing Company at 933 Louise Avenue, right next to Advent Coworking. The discussion is titled "Social Media and Kids. It's Complicated." It's all about how to navigate the issue of social media as a parent, with a panel of experts in tow.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is a production of Charlotte magazine and powered by OrthoCarolina.

Mar 12, 2018

Miss our most recent panel event at Catawba Brewing Co.? This episode presents the entire discussion (and the Q&A that followed). "#discussCLT: Me Too, Charlotte" asked this question: "What are we doing in Charlotte to make sure women are respected in any industry?" Hear this wide-ranging conversation for yourself.

Feb 26, 2018

Recently, Charlotte Symphony Orchestra and Queens University began a partnership to study engagement between live orchestral music and elderly Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. It's just one of several ways in which the symphony is deepening its connections with the community outside of uptown. In this episode of the #discussCLT Podcast, Andy Smith and Andy Goh talk to CSO CEO Mary Diessler about their community programs, her past experiences with orchestras across the country, and the stacked upcoming season for the Charlotte Symphony.

RSVP now for the next live #DiscussCLT event, Wednesday, February 28, 6 p.m. at Catwaba Brewing Company at 933 Louise Avenue, right next to Advent Coworking. This panel discussion, moderated by Charlotte magazine editor Kristen Wile, focuses on the #MeToo movement, and its effects on Charlotte. An expert panel will discuss where we are as a city, and what needs to be done to make sure women in every industry receive the same treatment as their male counterparts. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is a production of Charlotte magazine and powered by OrthoCarolina.

Feb 12, 2018

Weeks before the Blue Line Extension opens, bringing the light rail north to the University area of Charlotte, CATS CEO John Lewis sat down at his office in Uptown and spoke to Greg Lacour about what it's like to see the project come to fruition. We also discuss the other projects currently in progress and and those planned for the future for public transportation in the Charlotte area, as well as the ins and outs of communicating all of this with the public and Charlotte leaders. So buckle up and take a ride with us.

RSVP now for the next live #DiscussCLT event, Wednesday, February 28, 6 p.m. at Catwaba Brewing Company at 933 Louise Avenue, right next to Advent Coworking. This panel discussion, moderated by Charlotte magazine editor Kristen Wile, focuses on the #MeToo movement, and its effects on Charlotte. An expert panel will discuss where we are as a city, and what needs to be done to make sure women in every industry receive the same treatment as their male counterparts. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is a production of Charlotte magazine and powered by OrthoCarolina.

Jan 29, 2018

The first Women's Marches happened in cities all across the country shortly after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. Initially, the Women's Marches (which included more than four million protesters according to the Washington Post), were focused on Women's rights, equality and reproductive choices. 

In January 2018, the Women's March returned again to cities around the US, including here in Uptown Charlotte, but this time, they included rights across the political spectrum. Among some of the most prevalent themes of the march this year, in addition to women's rights, were immigrant rights, minority rights, war and income inequality.

In this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast, powered by OrthoCarolina, we were on the scene during the Women's March to talk to people about why they marched, what they thought had changed in the year since the last march, and what they hope to see in the future. Charlotte magazine Editor Kristen Wile also shares her thoughts on her first experience at the event.

Jan 19, 2018

It’s a busy week at Latin American Contemporary Art Projects in Freemore West, and not just because celebrated artist Carlos Estevez has a new show debuting at LACA. Artist Bryce Laguer’s Basal (or bah-SAUL) Coffee is finally opening inside the gallery. Basal is a vision that’s been brewing since the space opened 5 years ago, and it’s not just a coffee concept meant to sweeten the deal for gallery visitors. Laguer brings a singular, yet symbiotic vision to the project, inspired by his background as an artist, his multi-ethnic upbringing, and cafes in Morocco.

 

In this episode of the #discussCLT Podcast, powered by OrthoCarolina, Laguer explains what a coffee shop provides to an art gallery, how it helps address representation, and how he intends to make this shared space a place for community in Charlotte.

Dec 8, 2017

Welcome to the discussCLT Podcast, powered by OrthoCarolina.

Huddled inside a sun room in uptown Charlotte’s historic Dunhill Hotel, discussCLT podcast’s Andy Smith recently spoke to author and chef Michael Twitty about the history of Southern cooking, food’s power to unite people of varying cultures, and his new book, The Cooking Gene. The book traces Twitty’s own ancestry to North Carolina in the 1600s, while showing that so much of what we know about Southern food is rooted in the skills of enslaved people.

Andy starts by asking Twitty to describe his book. From there, the pair move onto to a few surprising topics.

Oct 27, 2017

In November of 2016, Share Charlotte’s Giving Tuesday campaign raised almost eight million dollars for local non-profits, which was the most out of any of the 94 campaigns in the US. That must mean that Charlotte’s non-profit scene is one of the strongest in the country, right?

Well… maybe.

Despite that eye-popping, or perhaps in this case, ear-popping number, many questions still surround non-profits in the Queen City.

Are there too many non-profits in the city, leading to inefficiencies in achieving their goals? Do the national non-profits command a disproportionate amount of donations and volunteer hours? How do NPOs battle their desired realities versus the public’s perception? And how does the public decide who to give their dollars to?

These are just a few of the topics discussed during the latest live #DiscussCLT event held Thursday, October 19 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company. A panel moderated by Charlotte magazine senior editor Adam Rhew dug deep into a variety of issues, as well as answered questions from the audience. The panel included Kelly Brooks, Founder and Executive Director of Share Charlotte; Michael DeVaul, Chief Community Impact Office for YMCA of Greater Charlotte; Mary Gallivan, Vice President and Director, Centers for Giving for Foundation for the Carolinas; and Josh Jacobson, Managing Director of Next Stage Consulting.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

Welcome to the #DiscussCLT podcast, a production of Charlotte magazine.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina.

Oct 13, 2017

Ahead of our next live #discussCLT event: Navigating Nonprofits, Thursday, October 19 at Lenny Boy Brewing, we wanted to take a look at one nonprofit that's just getting started in Charlotte.  So here’s a question: What happens when you have a minister named Canaan Grier, and a rapper/producer named Yung Citizen, and they join forces to help guide West Charlotte High School football players into manhood? This is Ready Citizens, a nonprofit that started just this year. In this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast, we’ll talk to the pair about how this works—and the future they’re trying to build in Charlotte’s West Side.

RSVP for the next live #DiscussCLT event Thursday, October 19 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company on South Tryon Street. The topic is Navigating Nonprofits, and a moderated panel will discuss how local nonprofits can best work together and avoid competition for donor money and volunteer hours. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

Welcome to the #DiscussCLT podcast, a production of Charlotte magazine.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina.

Sep 22, 2017

As Charlotte continues to grow and develop, the city’s creative class has struggled to find its place among the towering bank buildings and fresh new condos. Art spaces like galleries, music venues, and artist studios often take a backseat to mammoth residential, office and retail developments. There’s no lack of talent and creativity in Charlotte, however. The question them becomes, how does the city elevate its creative community to the same levels as the cities we aspire to be like?

To help discuss this, we talked to David Butler, Charlotte native and multi-discipline artist, who is heavily involved with many of the area’s artists and creators.

In this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast, we talk about how Charlotte can better embrace its creative community. We talk about what factors are in play and how artists can gain credibility in a city framed around the fiscally conservative mentality of the banking sector. Finally, we discuss Dave’s favorite projects and artists in Charlotte.

RSVP for the next live #DiscussCLT event Thursday, October 19 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company on South Tryon Street. The topic is Navigating Nonprofits, and a moderated panel will discuss how local nonprofits can best work together and avoid competition for donor money and volunteer hours. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

Welcome to the #DiscussCLT podcast.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina.

Sep 8, 2017

In Episode 23 of this podcast, we spoke with outgoing editor Charlotte magazine editor Michael Graff. Now we speak to Kristen Wile, the first female editor at the magazine in more than two decades. We talk about what she learned in our last #discussCLT event, her plans at the helm of the magazine, and planning the next year.  

Remember to get in on the discussion by tweeting @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #discussclt.

Aug 25, 2017

In this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast, we bring you the audio from this month's life #DiscussCLT event at Lenny Boy Brewing Company. The topic was Charlotte Media Matters, and a panel of media professionals from around the city weighed in on topics such as fake news, the evolution of media, and what the challenges of running a media out in 2017 are.

The panel that you'll hear includes Helen Schwab of the Charlotte Observer, Glenn Burkins of Q City Metro, Ted Williams of Charlotte Agenda and Ed Williams of WFAE. Michael Graff, former editor fo Charlotte magazine, moderated.

Remember to get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

Aug 11, 2017

As of the publishing of this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast on August 11, 2017, there have been 57 murders in Charlotte since the beginning of the year. To put that in perspective, there were 67 murders in all of 2016, and that was a seven-year high. Clearly, this spike in violent crime has people around the city asking themselves what’s behind this trend.

To help discuss this, we talked to 30-year CMPD homicide veteran Garry McFadden. In his time as a detective, McFadden has investigated more than 800 murders, and closed over 90% of them. He also has vivid memories of Charlotte’s most violent year on record, 1993, which saw 129 deaths.

In this episode of the #DiscussCLT podcast, we talk about the similarities between 1993 and today, what are the necessary steps that the city needs to take to reverse this trend, and the importance of community policing in reducing not only the murder rate, but incidents of police brutality as well.

RSVP for the next live #DiscussCLT event Thursday, August 17 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company on South Tryon Street. The topic is Charlotte Media Matters, and a moderated panel will discuss how the local media landscape has evolved and where it is headed. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

 

Jul 28, 2017

A lot of things have changed in the four years that Michael Graff has been the editor of Charlotte magazine. Since taking the position in April 2013, he’s overseen a transition among many key staff members, including a new publisher. Graff has also led the magazine through a redesign in August 2016, navigated the constantly changing media landscape, and guided the magazine to be a leader in the coverage of the Keith Lamont Scott protests, all while finding time to win a City and Regional magazine Association award for a story he wrote on the Myers Park High School football team.

However, last week, Graff announced that he would be stepping down from the position of editor at Charlotte magazine in August in order to pursue other writing opportunities.

We brought Graff into the podcasting studio at Advent Coworking to discuss his time at Charlotte magazine, his experience during the Keith Lamont Scott protests, and why he thinks there’s still a demand for long form journalism.

RSVP for the next live #DiscussCLT event Thursday, August 17 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company on South Tryon Street. The topic is Charlotte Media Matters, and a moderated panel will discuss how the local media landscape has evolved and where it is headed. The event is free but you must RSVP at discussclt.com.

Welcome to the #DiscussCLT podcast.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina

Jul 14, 2017

During the June 15, 2017 #DiscussCLT live event, the discussion was centered around the theme of a broken system leading to two very different Charlottes. The talk was focused and and sharp all night, but we bring you a short exchange from the Q&A session towards the end. Audience member Patrice Funderburk and panelists Toussaint Romain, Greg Collier and Lawana Mayfield speak about the 2011 Crossroad Charlotte Initiative, a sense of urgency in the conversation, and the frustrations of not being able to change the system directly.

Remember to get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT. Subscribe to the #DiscussCLT podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn Radio and wherever you find podcasts. Find our archives and live event schedule online at discussclt.com.

The #DiscussCLT Podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina.

Jun 23, 2017

Long before Charlotte’s food scene was dominated by tapas, fusions and small plates, soul food was the culinary cornerstone. Soul food has a long and intricate history in the southeast, and it extends far beyond cornbread and collard greens.

But what is soul food’s identity today? What about it’s history is often overlooked? And how does soul food stay true to it’s roots while evolving for the future?

To discuss these questions, Charlotte magazine Food Editor Kristen Wile talks to Chefs Michael Bowling of Soul Food Sessions and Greg Collier of The Yolk and @Dawn Cafe. Michael and Greg, who are both African American chefs, talk about what soul food means to them, what their goals are for Soul Food Sessions, and what some of the unseen challenges black chefs face in a predominantly white industry.

Get in on the discussion by tweeting us @Charlottemag and using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

Jun 9, 2017

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Charlotte’s in a rush to demolish its historically significant and character-filled buildings to build shiny but soulless spaces. It’s a common refrain at this point, one that most Charlotteans can agree is probably true, but undesirable nonetheless.  

So what are some ways to preserve that culture in a way that honors the past but is also suitable for the present? What are the challenges and goals that need to be considered? And in what ways can Charlotte communities benefit from a conscious effort to preserve history?

To help answer that question, we talked to Varian Shrum Camp North End Community Manager and Alex Smith, Design and Build Consultant. In our conversation we'll discuss Camp North End’s fascinating background, how they approach modernizing an almost 100 year old facility and what Charlotte can gain from similar approaches.

Thanks again to Varian Shrum and Alex Smith of Camp North End for the discussion. You can find out more about Camp North End on the web at camp.nc, and @campnorthend on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Remember to get in on the discussion by tweeting your thoughts and questions to us at @Charlottemag and by using the hashtag #DiscussCLT.

May 26, 2017

It’s no secret that the explosive growth of the craft beer industry around Charlotte has created an entirely new economic force that has become one of the city’s major attractions. Breweries like Olde Mecklenburg, NoDa, Birdsong, Triple C and more have become not just places to create a product, but to also hang out, host community events and be somewhere that you can really feel like you’re a part of the fabric of Charlotte.

However, one factor that is rarely considered when sipping a cool farmhouse sour or bourbon barrel-aged stout is the lack, or even complete absence of the African American community. Among the craft beer drinking population, you’d be hard pressed to find a group, much less one or two, African Americans among the massive sea of less melanated faces. The trend continues when you look at brewers, distributors and owners in craft beer, with only one brewery owner in the city being black.

To help address this issue, we talked to Tabu Terrell, owner of Three Spirits Brewing Company on Old Pineville Road. Also on the microphone are Kia Moore, writer and creative producer for Hip Hop University and Hip Hop Orchestrated; as well as Ryan Pitkin, news editor for Creative Loafing. Both Kia and Ryan wrote about this topic for the cover story in this week’s Creative Loafing, which featured Tabu Terrell on the cover.

One quick note: my usual partner in podcasting, Andy Smith, could not join us for this conversation as his wife was giving birth to their second child at the time. Congratulations, Andy.

Mark your calendars for the next live #DiscussCLT event, Thursday, June 15 at Lenny Boy Brewing Company, where the topic of discussion will be How a Broken System Led to Two Charlottes. A moderated panel will look at how our city came to be known for its economic disparity as much as our skyscrapers. The event is free, but you must RSVP.

Welcome to the #DiscussCLT podcast.

The #DiscussCLT podcast is powered by OrthoCarolina.

May 12, 2017

With the explosive growth of the banking industry over the past 40 years in Charlotte, the city’s immigrant population has also increased sharply. Between 2000 and 2010, the immigrant population nearly doubled from 4.7 - 8.4 statewide, spurred by rapid real estate growth and the corresponding demand for jobs in construction and the service industry.

However, Charlotte has not been immune to the increased enforcement from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, seen in recent months nationwide. After a single week in February that saw more than 100 undocumented immigrants arrested and facing deportation, a renewed sense of unease has swept into the Latino community. The city’s leadership has said that they are not helping to enforce these arrests, but they haven’t outwardly denounced them either.

On this week’s #DiscussCLT podcast, we talk to Oliver Merino, community activist and Programs Coordinator for the Levine Museum of the New South. Merino immigrated to Monroe, NC when he was ten years old and was eligible for DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, when the Obama administration founded it in 2012. As a community activist, Oliver has been a leader in the push for immigration rights, helping to organize the record-setting crowds at Uptown rallies in February and May.

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